Horse Conch


 

Conch Or Conch?

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Some people think that the word conch is pronounced conk and some people think its pronounced like it’s spelled. Who is right? The correct pronunciation is conk.

Top Predator

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Horse conchs are one of the top snail predators. They’ll eat almost any univalve or bivalve smaller than them, which may include banded tulips, true tulips, lightning whelks, milk conchs, ponderous arks, cockles, stone crabs, quahogs, hermit crabs and their favorite food, pin shells.

Even though horse conchs are at the top of the snail food chain they’re not at the top of the food chain. Birds, humans, and even other horse conchs are a threat to these highly carnivorous snails.

Crawling Or Sliding?

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Many people think that horse conchs move by just sliding across the bottom. If that were the case the snail would continuously bog itself into the sand and mud. The truth is horse conchs actually crawl across the bottom. Its literally like they are walking! If you want to see this in motion, the movie “Tides” by Blue Planet, produced by BBC, has filmed this.

Range

Horse conchs are mainly found in west Atlantic waters and the Gulf of Mexico.

Other Good Resources On Horse Conchs

The movie Tidal Seas by Blue Planet, which is produced by BBC, has good information on horse conchs.

Florida’s Fabulous Seashells by Williams/Carmichael has good information on horse conchs.

Florida’s Seashells by Blair and Dawn Witherington has good information on horse conchs.

Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, has a good webpage on horse conchs.

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